KS: SUZANNE HALL

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Suzanne Hall

London School of Economics and Political Science (London, UK)

Suzanne Hall is Director of the Cities Programme and an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research explores the intersection of global migration and urban marginalisation. Through an ESRC award she has focused on migrant economies and spaces on urban high streets across the UK. Suzi is author of City, Street and Citizen: The measure of the ordinary and is a recipient of a 2017 Philip Leverhulme Prize.

http://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/suzi-hall

 

Migrant Margins: Brutal borders and street exchange

Friday, 29th June, 16.30-18.00

The ‘migrant margins’ emerges in the intersection of global migration and urban marginalisation. Focusing on livelihoods forged by migrants on four peripheral streets in Birmingham, Bristol, Leicester and Manchester, I draw on face-to-face surveys with self-employed proprietors. Despite significant variables amongst proprietors, these individuals had all become traders on streets in marginalised parts of UK cities, and I address whether ‘race’ matters more than class for how certain groups become emplaced in the city. Narratives of inequality and racism feature prominently in the proprietors’ accounts of where they settled in the city and what limited forms of work are available in the urban margins. Yet as significant to proprietors’ experiences of trade are repertoires of entrepreneurial agility and cross-cultural exchange. Through the concept of the ‘migrant margins’ I explore the overlap of human capacities and structural discrimination that spans global and urban space. I combine urban sociological understandings of ‘race’ and inequality with fluid understandings of makeshift city-making that have emerged in post-colonial urban studies. Such combinations encourage connections between the histories and geographies of how people and places become bordered, together with city-making practices that are both marginal and transgressive.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.